Pages Navigation Menu

Get the latest science on Performance Through Wellbeing:

We Respect Your Privacy. Your details are never shared with third parties.

Blog

Workplace wellbeing : Going beyond doing something nice for your people.

| Mar 3, 2021 | blog-en, Professional Wellbeing | 0 comments

Workplace wellbeing : Going beyond doing something nice for your people.

Great leaders are strategic about caring for their people.

When I ask leaders to assess their efforts in promoting a culture of wellbeing in their businesses, more often than not they respond with “We’ve got it covered”, “We are doing well”, and so on. However, when I dig deeper using tools that objectively measure the level of wellbeing at their workplace, I find that this is not quite the case. My results often shock them, as they realise that their perception is divorced from reality.

It is 2021, and Gallup still reports that “Nearly 85% of employees worldwide are still not engaged or are actively disengaged at work, despite more effort from companies”.  Authentic leaders who provide a unique and memorable work experience to their colleagues (which in turn drives business performance) have several things in common.

They recognise that their perception might be misleading, so they consistently measure their efforts in workplace wellbeing.  

They compare their results against international standards and make the required investments to course-correct. 

Rinse and repeat.

Good leaders never stop working on the workplace wellbeing in their company, because they understand that investing in employee wellbeing is not just about holding a health fair in March, a webinar in June and Yoga sessions on Friday mornings. It’s about consistency, objectivity, and empathy in measuring, planning and executing their efforts for workplace wellbeing every year, day in and day out.

We have to go beyond what we “think” is right and be strategic about workplace wellbeing.  We have to put in the work and knowledge necessary to create a workplace culture that brings the best out of everyone.

Always at the service of your wellbeing,

César

How to get your mojo back after being off work

| Jan 20, 2021 | blog-en, Professional Wellbeing | 0 comments

How to get your mojo back after being off work

Helpful tips to get back into “work mode” after taking some time off.

Have you noticed how getting back into “work mode” after you’ve taken some time off can be surprisingly challenging? Some people even panic a little believing they have lost their mojo for good.

But don’t you worry, you can quickly regain your levels of productivity and focus if you follow these tips:
Prioritise, prioritise, prioritise. – Rather than absorbing yourself in your inbox as your first order of the day, get a pen and paper and write down the most important things that you need to focus on.  Once you have a clear action plan based on your top priorities, proceed with relentless focus. As Bruce Lee once professed “The successful warrior is the average man with laser-like focus.”

Check-in with your team. Don’t accept every meeting that you are invited to attend. A better use of your time is to have short and focused meetings with key members of your team to get your relationships back in sync. Your conversations should allow you to confirm your priorities and give you the extra jolt of energy you need to kick-start your return.

Let your intentions rule your day. Ensure that you start your day knowing what you would like to accomplish during that day and that week.  Whenever you feel that something is distracting you, go back to the safe harbour of your intention to remind you to stay on course.

Keep taking breaks. Just because you have only now come back from a decent break does not mean that you should neglect taking time off several times a day to recharge yourself. Remember to take 5 to 10-minute breaks every 90 minutes if you want to be operating at your best.

And in the words of the late Steve Jobs, never forget that what you need is “Focus and simplicity…. Once you get there, you can move mountains.”

Always at the service of your wellbeing.

César

2021: It’s a Mindset Game

| Jan 12, 2021 | blog-en, Mental Wellbeing | 0 comments

2021: It’s a Mindset Game

Our 2021 mindset plays an essential role in our growth, development and success. Have you set yourself up for 2021?

The new year has finally arrived and if we want to make the most of it, we need to ask ourselves a fundamental question: How am I setting myself up for a great 2021?

Our 2021 mindset will play an essential role in our growth, development and success in the coming year. For this, we need to embark on a process of reflection. We need to begin to reconcile the events of 2020 in a positive light. Ask yourself the following questions:

1) What good came out of my 2020 experience?

2) What opportunities has 2020 created for me?3) What learnings can I bring into 2021?

At face value, some of us may have experienced more downside than upside in 2020. However, by taking the time to reframe the downside, we are likely to find valuable lessons or give meaning to what happened in the past year.

The lotus flower starts off as a bud underwater in murky ponds but blooms from these muddy waters perfectly clean and beautiful. The strength of the lotus flower resides in you as well. Tap into this energy and make the most of this brand new year.

Always at the service of your wellbeing,

César

You are out of your Mind

| Oct 22, 2016 | blog-en, Mental Wellbeing, slider | 0 comments

You are out of your Mind

Last night I had the pleasure to visit the historical Royal Institution of Great Britain to attend a lecture by Dr. Daniel Siegel, a Harvard Medical Doctor who is now a Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine. The topic: The Human Mind – New Insights from Neuroscience.

The Royal Institution was founded in 1799 by leading British scientists of the age in an effort to build an organisation devoted to scientific education and research. I was sitting in the same space were in 1856, Michael Faraday postulated to the scientific community this “crazy” idea of harnessing the power of invisible electromagnetic fields for use in technology. (more…)

Breaking Bad : The Power of Detaching from Work

| Apr 7, 2016 | blog-en, slider, Workplace Wellbeing | 0 comments

Breaking Bad : The Power of Detaching from Work

Whilst hard at work, sometimes we forget that we are human beings. We try to squeeze hours out of the day to meet deadlines and obligations, completely ignoring certain principles of human biology that relate to performance. After all, we are biological beings, so there are certain principles that we need to observe if maximising our performance is something we aspire to.

In order to achieve high levels of performance consistently, we must not ignore a basic principle that will help us sustain our capacity to perform even in the midst of pressure: oscillation – the rhythmic movement between energy expenditure (stress) and renewal (recovery).

Experts in the field of biology recommend that our mind-body system need recovery every 90 to 120 minutes. So for instance, if you start working at 8am and don’t detach from your work until lunchtime, by 10am that morning, most likely your physical, mental and emotional capacity will start to diminish, affecting the output and quality of your work. It’s a fact of science.

I’m still shocked when I see executives scheduling working-lunches let alone the appalling working-breaks – how is that for an oxymoron! The key to high performance is breaking linearity – the failure to oscillate between energy expenditure and recovery. Rituals that prompt recovery at key points during the day will increase your levels of energy, concentration and motivation – guaranteed.

Recommendation

Remember that to maximise your level of performance, you must break linearity and promote oscillation. Consider these suggestions:

– Get away from your desk or go for a walk every 90 minutes. Don’t succumb to the temptation of taking your phone or tablet with you. Completely detach from your work and screen time for the space of 5 to 10 minutes – this will allow your mind-body system to recharge.

– Schedule your breaks as you would an important meeting. By scheduling your breaks, you are more likely to take them.

– Find a break partner. Socialising is a sure-fire way to refresh your brain, so enlist a work friend to have some tea, have a chat, or take a short walk with you.

– Meditate or do some chair yoga. Search the web for “chair yoga” and you will find very useful videos on how to relax from head to toe without getting out of your chair.

– Make the most of your lunch break. By all means, do not eat at your desk.

The unknown reason behind why we feel stressed : Tip 4

| Mar 16, 2016 | blog-en, Physical Wellbeing, slider | 0 comments

The unknown reason behind why we feel stressed : Tip 4

In my previous articles, I mentioned 3 of the 4 reasons why we get stressed: Perceiving situations as stressful based on how our brain is wired, ingesting foods that rapidly raise our sugar levels and consuming stimulants (particularly caffeine). I’d like to share with you the 4th and less known reason why we experience stress: A hormone imbalance and/or deficiency. (more…)

The impact of coffee and tea in your stress levels : tip 3

| Jan 22, 2016 | blog-en, Physical Wellbeing, slider | 0 comments

The impact of coffee and tea in your stress levels : tip 3

In my previous posts, I shared with you two of the 4 reasons why we experience stress. The first one relates to how we perceive situations as a result of how our neural network is configured in our brain. The second trigger relates to blood sugar dips as a result of eating food with a high content of sugar that gets rapidly released in our bloodstream. This article will focus on a third common stress trigger: the consumption of caffeine loaded stimulants such as coffee and most types of tea.

Drinking coffee and tea has become so commonplace in our day-to-day lives that we have forgotten how these seemingly innocuous beverages affect our mind-body system, specifically when it comes to stress. Let us not forget that both coffee and non-herbal teas are categorised as stimulants alongside colas, caffeinated drinks, chocolate, alcohol, energy drinks, cigarettes and caffein pills. (more…)

Smart Eating to Minimise Stress : Tip 2

| Jan 8, 2016 | blog-en, Physical Wellbeing, slider | 0 comments

Smart Eating to Minimise Stress : Tip 2

In my previous post, I shared with you one the four reasons why we experience stress, which boils down to how we perceive situations based on the configuration of our neural network in our brain. So let’s move on to the second potential stress trigger: food.

Not many people are aware of this fact, but what we eat and how we eat can raise our stress levels even without the presence of external stimuli or challenging circumstances. To understand how food has this type of influence, it is important to remember that the stress response in our mind-body system is triggered by the release of primarily two hormones: adrenaline and cortisol. (more…)

How to Change your Perception to Minimise your Stress : Tip 1

| Dec 30, 2015 | blog-en, slider, Workplace Wellbeing | 0 comments

How to Change your Perception to Minimise your Stress : Tip 1

As I mentioned in my previous post, there are 4 factors that can trigger the stress response in us, and in this article, we will briefly discuss the first and most common trigger : our perception (thoughts).

How we perceive situations, events or circumstances, will play a massive role in whether we will create stress for ourselves at any given point in time.  For example, the type of response to an email we have just received from a coworker heavily criticising our work in a project, will come down to how our neural network is configured in our brain. (more…)

The 4 Real Reasons Why we Experience Stress

| Nov 3, 2015 | blog-en, slider, Workplace Wellbeing | 0 comments

The 4 Real Reasons Why we Experience Stress

If lately you have been ill, or have had trouble focusing and concentrating, or if you have been experiencing mood swings, feeling withdrawn or even experienced loss of motivation, commitment or confidence, most likely you are experiencing symptoms associated with stress. In order to cope with stress effectively, it is important to understand the stress response in the first place.

To keep us alive, nature hard-wired in our mind-body system a physical and mental response known as the stress response. In ancient times, when our ancestors were faced with a threat to their survival, such as confronting a hungry lion, their biology would trigger the fight or flight (stress) response. (more…)

 César Gamio - Certified Corporate Wellness Specialist - CesarGamio.com
 César Gamio - Executive Life Coach - EMCC-EIA - CesarGamio.com
 César Gamio - Chopra Center Certified Instructor - CesarGamio.com
César Gamio - Certified Corporate Wellness Specialist - CesarGamio.comCésar Gamio - Executive Life Coach - EMCC-EIA - CesarGamio.com
César Gamio - Chopra Center Certified Instructor - CesarGamio.com